International Day Against Homophobia is marked on 17th May each year, the anniversary of the day, when in 1990, The World Health Organisation or WHO removed homosexuality from its list of mental disorders.

Homophobia is the name given to a range of negative attitudes and feelings including ignorance, prejudice, fear and hatred towards people who have identified themselves as: gay, lesbian, bisexual or transsexual. It can manifest in many ways, typical examples include: name calling, bullying, ridicule, exclusion, physical violence, sexual violence and in severe cases, murder.

Transphobia is a dislike, fear or hatred or targeting of transgender people.

There are dozen of countries across the world where it is illegal to be gay. Men and women are imprisoned (14 years to life) and even put to death, because of their sexuality, examples:Nigeria, Syria, Sudan, Iran, Somalia, Zambia, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Tunisia.

Around 40% of world’s population is criminalised and not allowed to choose who they love.

Around 70% of world’s population live under laws, registrations that severely restricts their freedom of expression.

It was created in 2004 to draw the attention of policymakers, opinion leaders, social movements, the public and the media to the violence and discrimination experienced by LGBTI people internationally. – See more at: http://dayagainsthomophobia.org/may-17/#sthash.MiSFtW0x.dpuf

 

It was created in 2004 to draw the attention of policymakers, opinion leaders, social movements, the public and the media to the violence and discrimination experienced by LGBTI people internationally. – See more at: http://dayagainsthomophobia.org/may-17/#sthash.MiSFtW0x.dpuf

IDAHO was first marked in 2004 and is now celebrated in more than 120 countries around the world.

It’s a moment when everyone can speak up and take action. On this day our opponents have to face millions of our supporters, allies and friends worldwide.

I support IDAHO, because for me it’s something worth fighting for. I am neither ashamed or scared of saying that I am bisexual.

I am proud of myself, even when people call me names and tease me. I can only say that I am lucky enough to live in a country, were being homosexual is not illegal a crime. Others are not so lucky.

 

 

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